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Research Article

Structural Extremes in a Cretaceous Dinosaur

  • Paul C. Sereno mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: dinosaur@uchicago.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Organismal Biology and Anatomy, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America

    X
  • Jeffrey A. Wilson,

    Affiliation: Museum of Paleontology and Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

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  • Lawrence M. Witmer,

    Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, United States of America

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  • John A. Whitlock,

    Affiliation: Museum of Paleontology and Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

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  • Abdoulaye Maga,

    Affiliation: Institute for Human Science, University of Niamey, Niamey, Republic of Niger

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  • Oumarou Ide,

    Affiliation: Institute for Human Science, University of Niamey, Niamey, Republic of Niger

    X
  • Timothy A. Rowe

    Affiliation: Jackson School of Geological Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America

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  • Published: November 21, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001230
  • Published in PLOS ONE

Reader Comments (5)

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Cretaceous "cow"

Posted by Ken_Carpenter on 16 Nov 2007 at 02:37 GMT

I am extremely pleased to see this much awaited paper finally published, especially in an open access journal. The article discusses what can only be described as a truly weird skull. To call Nigersaurus a "cow of the Mesozoic" is accurate since its broad muzzle is clearly an adaptation for cropping low vegetation near the ground.

Kenneth Carpenter, Ph.D.
Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology
Denver Museum of Nature & Science


RE: Cretaceous "cow"

Dinosaur1 replied to Ken_Carpenter on 30 Apr 2008 at 08:00 GMT

Thanks for the comments. The structure of the muzzle and the clues to head orientation from the inner ear do suggest ground-level foraging----something we have tended to overlook given the fixation that such "bottom" feeding is for grass during the Cenozoic.
It alsso generated a little heat from those who prefer reconstructing feeding function as an envelope, based on the maximum swing of a headless neck. Attacching the skull, I think, is a good idea.