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Research Article

Structural Extremes in a Cretaceous Dinosaur

  • Paul C. Sereno mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: dinosaur@uchicago.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Organismal Biology and Anatomy, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America

    X
  • Jeffrey A. Wilson,

    Affiliation: Museum of Paleontology and Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Lawrence M. Witmer,

    Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, United States of America

    X
  • John A. Whitlock,

    Affiliation: Museum of Paleontology and Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America

    X
  • Abdoulaye Maga,

    Affiliation: Institute for Human Science, University of Niamey, Niamey, Republic of Niger

    X
  • Oumarou Ide,

    Affiliation: Institute for Human Science, University of Niamey, Niamey, Republic of Niger

    X
  • Timothy A. Rowe

    Affiliation: Jackson School of Geological Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America

    X
  • Published: November 21, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001230
  • Published in PLOS ONE

Reader Comments (5)

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Many Congratulations

Posted by steelgraham on 17 Nov 2007 at 18:59 GMT

Many congratulations to the Authors of this immensely important Paper.

I commend them for choosing to publish this Paper in a cutting edge Journal like PLoS ONE.

As PLoS's Dr Chris Surridge pointed out two days ago here, http://www.plos.org/cms/n... this is a significantly important Paper on a number of levels.

Personally, I can't think of a more brilliant example of the major significance of the societal benefits of Open Access publishing.

As Dr Surridge said in his blog:- "Millions of people will read about the dinosaur in their newspapers throughout the World". I would also add that probably even more will learn about all of this via the biggest reference library in the world - the Internet !!

Major hat-tip to all.

Graham


RE: Many Congratulations

Dinosaur1 replied to steelgraham on 30 Apr 2008 at 07:15 GMT

Thanks for the compliments. The work on this dinosaur was a real team effort, from the sands of the Sahara to a lab in Chicago, to the CT and prototyping facilities in many cities. You are correct that people in Niger, one of the poorest places in the world, can read about the dinosaur that bears the name of their country. Go open acccess!