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Research Article

On the Origin of the Treponematoses: A Phylogenetic Approach

  • Kristin N. Harper mail,

    knharpe@emory.edu

    Affiliation: Department of Population Biology, Ecology, and Evolution, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

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  • Paolo S. Ocampo,

    Affiliation: School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

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  • Bret M. Steiner,

    Affiliation: Laboratory Reference and Research Branch, Division of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention, NCHHSTP, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

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  • Robert W. George,

    Affiliation: Laboratory Reference and Research Branch, Division of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention, NCHHSTP, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

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  • Michael S. Silverman,

    Affiliations: Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Lakeridge Health Centre, Ontario, Canada

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  • Shelly Bolotin,

    Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada

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  • Allan Pillay,

    Affiliation: Laboratory Reference and Research Branch, Division of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention, NCHHSTP, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

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  • Nigel J. Saunders,

    Affiliation: Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • George J. Armelagos

    Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America

    X

Reader Comments (4)

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Additional in press and recently published articles on syphilis

Posted by sblower on 15 Jan 2008 at 20:11 GMT

Dear Authors,

I greatly enjoyed reading your very interesting article.

I would like to mention that Kevin Fenton of the CDC, my research group at UCLA, and I have a paper that reviews the history, epidemiology and modeling of syphilis coming out in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal in April 2008.

In addition, we have recently posted, on Nature Preceedings, a second article where we investigate the recently proposed controversial hypothesis that syphilis epidemics cycle. In this article we conclude, based upon an analysis of empirical data and mathematical models, that there is little evidence to support the hypothesis that syphilis epidemics cycle.

Our Nature Preceedings article can be found at:

http://precedings.nature....

sincerely Professor Sally Blower
Director of the Centre for Biomedical Modeling
Semel Institute of Neuroscience & Human Behavior
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA