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Research Article

One Bacterial Cell, One Complete Genome

  • Tanja Woyke,

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

    X
  • Damon Tighe,

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

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  • Konstantinos Mavromatis,

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

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  • Alicia Clum,

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

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  • Alex Copeland,

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

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  • Wendy Schackwitz,

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

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  • Alla Lapidus,

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

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  • Dongying Wu,

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

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  • John P. McCutcheon,

    Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States of America

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  • Bradon R. McDonald,

    Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States of America

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  • Nancy A. Moran,

    Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States of America

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  • James Bristow,

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

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  • Jan-Fang Cheng mail

    JFCheng@lbl.gov

    Affiliation: Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California, United States of America

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  • Published: April 23, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0010314
  • Published in PLOS ONE

Reader Comments (1)

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DMIN?

Posted by Thomas_Haverkamp on 05 May 2010 at 08:16 GMT

I have read the article and I think it is very interesting work. I only have a small question about the abbreviation: DMIN.
Throughout the entire manuscript it is used, but I have not seen what DMIN stands for? I have to guess DMIN stands for: Draeculacephala minerva, but this is not clear from the text.

No competing interests declared.

RE: DMIN?

jfcheng replied to Thomas_Haverkamp on 05 May 2010 at 22:56 GMT

Yes, DMIN does have the meaning of Draeculacephala minerva. The usage of DMIN in this article, however, is part of the symbiont's name (e.g. Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN). The proper abbreviation for the host, Draeculacephala minerva, is D. minerva. Since we do not consider DMIN as the abbreviation of Draeculacephala minerva, we did not indicate that in the text. I am sorry if that caused any confusion.

No competing interests declared.