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Research Article

De Novo Designed Proteins from a Library of Artificial Sequences Function in Escherichia Coli and Enable Cell Growth

  • Michael A. Fisher,

    Affiliation: Departments of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

    Current address: Energy Biosciences Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California, United States of America

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  • Kara L. McKinley,

    Affiliation: Departments of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

    Current address: Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America

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  • Luke H. Bradley,

    Affiliation: Departments of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

    Current address: Departments of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States of America

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  • Sara R. Viola,

    Affiliation: Departments of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

    Current address: Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, United States of America

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  • Michael H. Hecht mail

    hecht@princeton.edu

    Affiliation: Departments of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States of America

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  • Published: January 04, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0015364
  • Published in PLOS ONE

Reader Comments (6)

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is that surprising?

Posted by Vincent_Danos on 19 Feb 2011 at 17:28 GMT

de novo proteins are unlike those of any known natural proteins
http://plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0015364#article1.body1.sec2.sec1.p4

as one is sampling from a large set of possible molecules, i am wondering what would be the chances that any one of them gets close to a known natural one?

No competing interests declared.

RE: is that surprising?

Vincent_Danos replied to Vincent_Danos on 20 Feb 2011 at 09:44 GMT

The above remark is supposed to be a note on the following sentence in the paper "NCBI-BLAST searches indicate the sequences of the de novo proteins are unlike those of any known natural proteins".

More generally it would be nice to know something about the probability distribution of the synthetic proteins on their sequence space, and elements for comparing with natural ones - do all of the sequences fold properly? what is the fraction of natural proteins that follow the same pattern? etc

No competing interests declared.