Advertisement
Editorial

Ten Simple Rules for the Open Development of Scientific Software

  • Andreas Prlić mail,

    andreas.prlic@gmail.com

    Affiliation: San Diego Supercomputer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America

    X
  • James B. Procter

    Affiliation: School of Life Sciences Research, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland, United Kingdom

    X

Reader Comments (3)

Post a new comment on this article

You would certainly hope that this was true

Posted by danbolser on 10 Dec 2012 at 10:36 GMT

People with similar or related research interests who discover the project will find that they have more to gain from collaborating than from competing with the original developers
http://ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002802#article1.body1.sec5.p1

If the project is well organized, and transparent this should be the case. I like the quote from here [1]:

"Making important decisions in private is like spraying contributor repellant on your project."

Ahh...


[1] http://producingoss.com/en/setting-tone.html#avoid-private-discussions

No competing interests declared.