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Research Article

Scaling of Soaring Seabirds and Implications for Flight Abilities of Giant Pterosaurs

  • Katsufumi Sato mail,

    katsu@ori.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    Affiliation: International Coastal Research Center, Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Otsuchi, Iwate, Japan

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  • Kentaro Q. Sakamoto,

    Affiliation: Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan

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  • Yutaka Watanuki,

    Affiliation: Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Japan

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  • Akinori Takahashi,

    Affiliation: National Institute of Polar Research, Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

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  • Nobuhiro Katsumata,

    Affiliation: International Coastal Research Center, Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Otsuchi, Iwate, Japan

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  • Charles-André Bost,

    Affiliation: Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé-CNRS, Villier en Bois, Beauvoir/Niort, France

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  • Henri Weimerskirch

    Affiliation: Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé-CNRS, Villier en Bois, Beauvoir/Niort, France

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  • Published: April 29, 2009
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0005400
  • Published in PLOS ONE

Reader Comments (4)

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Pterosaurs could fly in a different atmosphere?

Posted by Wyoming84 on 01 May 2009 at 17:42 GMT

The authors seem to have not considered the affects on Pterosaur flight in an atmoshphere that likely contained more oxygen and carbon dioxide, providing more lift for their flapping wings. The Mesozoic atmosphere was not exactly like the present as the ancient world was experiencing a global greenhouse during this time.

No competing interests declared.