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Editorial

Ten Simple Rules for Effective Computational Research

  • James M. Osborne mail,

    James.Osborne@cs.ox.ac.uk

    Affiliations: Computational Biology Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Oxford, United Kingdom, Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Miguel O. Bernabeu,

    Affiliations: CoMPLEX, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University College London, Physics Building, London, United Kingdom, Centre for Computational Science, Department of Chemistry, University College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Maria Bruna,

    Affiliations: Computational Biology Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Oxford, United Kingdom, Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Ben Calderhead,

    Affiliation: CoMPLEX, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University College London, Physics Building, London, United Kingdom

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  • Jonathan Cooper,

    Affiliation: Computational Biology Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • Neil Dalchau,

    Affiliation: Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Sara-Jane Dunn,

    Affiliation: Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Alexander G. Fletcher,

    Affiliation: Wolfson Centre for Mathematical Biology, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Andrew Wiles Building, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • Robin Freeman,

    Affiliations: Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom, CoMPLEX, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University College London, Physics Building, London, United Kingdom

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  • Derek Groen,

    Affiliation: Centre for Computational Science, Department of Chemistry, University College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Bernhard Knapp,

    Affiliation: Department of Statistics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • Greg J. McInerny,

    Affiliations: Computational Biology Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Oxford, United Kingdom, Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Gary R. Mirams,

    Affiliation: Computational Biology Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • Joe Pitt-Francis,

    Affiliation: Computational Biology Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • Biswa Sengupta,

    Affiliation: The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • David W. Wright,

    Affiliations: CoMPLEX, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University College London, Physics Building, London, United Kingdom, Centre for Computational Science, Department of Chemistry, University College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Christian A. Yates,

    Affiliation: Wolfson Centre for Mathematical Biology, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Andrew Wiles Building, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • David J. Gavaghan,

    Affiliation: Computational Biology Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • Stephen Emmott,

    Affiliation: Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom

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  • Charlotte Deane

    Affiliation: Department of Statistics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

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Reader Comments (2)

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Software Carpentry is not aimed at computer scientists

Posted by neilfws on 31 Mar 2014 at 20:37 GMT

The article states: "While many guides to software development exist, they are often aimed at computer scientists [6]" and cites in reference [6] the Software Carpentry website.

Software Carpentry is not aimed at computer scientists; it aims to teach computer science best practice to researchers who do not have formal computer science training. Their FAQ [1] states that:

- Software Carpentry is a volunteer organization whose goal is to make scientists more productive, and their work more reliable, by teaching them basic computing skills
- computing is now an integral part of every aspect of science, but most scientists are never taught how to build, use, validate, and share software well

[1] http://software-carpentry...

No competing interests declared.

RE: Software Carpentry is not aimed at computer scientists

JamesOsborne replied to neilfws on 02 Apr 2014 at 17:23 GMT

The authors fully agree that Software Carpentry is not aimed at computer scientists.

The sentence in question is badly phrased and could lead to confusion; we intended to show our support for Software Carpentry's position (so "While many guides to software development exist, they are often aimed at computer
scientists", and that this is a problem acknowledged by [6]).

In fact at least one of the authors is a Software Carpentry instructor, we whole heatedly support the initiative, and reference it in the supplementary material as an excellent training resource.

Competing interests declared: I am an author of the paper.