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Policy Forum

Grand Challenges in Global Health: Engaging Civil Society Organizations in Biomedical Research in Developing Countries

  • Anant Bhan mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed: anant.bhan@utoronto.ca

    X
  • Jerome A Singh,
  • Ross E. G Upshur,
  • Peter A Singer,
  • Abdallah S Daar
  • Published: September 11, 2007
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.0040272
  • Published in PLOS Medicine

Reader Comments (1)

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Extend Principles of Community and Civil Society Engagement to Developed Countries

Posted by plosmedicine on 31 Mar 2009 at 00:13 GMT

Author: Robert Reinhard
Position: Member Community Advisory Group
Institution: San Francisco Dept of Public Health Research Section
E-mail: rreinhard@mofo.com
Submitted Date: September 11, 2007
Published Date: September 12, 2007
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

The four articles published on Ethical Social and Cultural Elements of the grand challenges program were salutary, rewarding and clear. I would only add a qualifier about the two articles on engaging developing country community and civil society. One element of the grandeur of the challenges is their global reach, and it is easy to leave out of those evaluations that civil and community members in developed countries also require participation rights and rules. Many at risk individuals in otherwise wealthy countries do not share in the national gifts that make life easier or tolerable for some. In the U.S., lack of insurance, discrimination, stigma and other factors often make participation in health enterprise difficult. The program the authors set out can and should be expanded in all settings where it could benefit research advances

No competing interests declared.